Center for Global & International Studies
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Past Events



Kansas Museum of History: J.R.R. Tolkien and the Battle of the Somme
Jonathan R. Casey, archivist, The National World War I Museum and Memorial
Friday, November 18, 6:30 pm | Kansas Museum of History (6425 SW 6th Ave, Topeka)

Tolkien’s experience during the Battle of the Somme may have influenced his literary works, namely The Hobbit and the Lord Of The Rings. The presentation includes images from the WWI Museum’s collections that match passages from the books. 


Dublin Internship Online Info Session
Friday, November 18, 9:00-10:00 am

Learn more about KU's academic internship program(s) in Dublin! Whether you want to gain experience in the world of finance, express yourself at a PR agency, bring history to life at a museum, debate politics or advocate with nonprofit organizations, the right internship is there for you. Join us online to explore the possibilities. To access the webinar, please log in at: global.gotomeeting.com/join/231960733

For more information about the info session, call 785-864-3742 or email studyabroad@ku.edu.

For more information about the internships, see www.eusainternships.org.


Area Studies in the Global Age: Community, Place, Identity
Thursday, November 3, 7:00 pm | The Commons

Join us for a panel discussion on the interdisciplinary book Area Studies in the Global Age:  Community, Place, Identity (2015). In contrast to sometimes oversimplified, globalized thinking, the studies featured in this book argue for the importance of understanding particular human experience and effects of global changes on real people’s lives. Copies of the book will be available for purchase.

Panelists include:

  • Edith W. Clowes, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Virginia
  • J. Megan Greene, Department of History, KU
  • Marike Janzen, Germanic Languages and Literatures, Coordinator of Peace & Conflict Studies, KU
  • John James Kennedy, Department of Political Science, KU
  • Elizabeth MacGonagle, Department of History, Director of the Kansas African Studies Center, KU
  • Mariya Omelicheva, Department of Political Science, KU

Sponsored by Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Center for East Asian Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Department of History, Department of Political Science, Center for Global & International Studies, Kansas African Studies Center, The Commons.


Human (and Post-Human) Layers of Time: Reinhart Koselleck and Recent Media Historiography
Thursday, November 3, 4:30 pm | Max Kade Center

Sean Franzel: University of Missouri, Columbia

This talk will compare the German historian Reinhart Koselleck’s theory of sediments or layers of time (Zeitschichten) with recent theories of multiple, heterogeneous media times. Koselleck’s theory of history and media historiography offers new insights into modernity as an epoch rife with the temporal structures of repetition, ephemerality and duration, acceleration, and asynchronicity. Despite, however, the similarities between Koselleck’s paradigms and other recent approaches to media theory, they differ vis-à-vis the function of “humanness” in modern time. While media theory explores its object through the lens of the post-human, Koselleck is more interested in grounding historical experience in explicitly anthropological preconditions. Cosponsored by Germanic Languages and Literatures, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Department of History, Film and Media Studies, European Studies Program.


Lawrence in Arabia
Monday, October 17, 7:30 pm | Lied Center Pavilion

Scott Anderson, author of Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East. At the end of World War I, a British colonel, T. E. Lawrence, better known as “Lawrence of Arabia,” warned in vain against plans to divide the Middle East into imperial spheres of control. Disaster struck almost as he had foretold. Today the world lives with the consequences of his ignored warning. This talk will focus on the life of T. E. Lawrence and bring that history forward to the present day. Scott Anderson compiled a report, based on trips he took to the Middle East, on the Arab Spring revolutions. He will show how much of the region’s current turmoil has its roots in decisions made nearly a century ago and also discuss where the crisis is likely to go next. Reception and book signing to follow. Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities. This event is part of KU’s World War I Centennial Commemoration, coordinated by the European Studies Program. See here for more info.


Kansas Museum of History: World War I Memorials and Monuments
Jim Heiman, Metropolitan Community College, Independence, MO
Friday, October 14, 6:30 pm | Kansas Museum of History (6425 SW 6th Ave, Topeka)


Soldiers from the Kansas City area who died in France were honored at public ceremonies in that country. When bodies were returned to KC, soldiers were buried privately and then honored publicly at memorials and monuments. Private grief became public mourning, thus ritualizing war remembrance.


Postcards from Abroad: Sleeping Tips from Around the World
Wednesday, October 12, 8:58 pm and Saturday, October 15, 1:04 pm | Tune in to 91.5 FM KPR in Lawrence

This postcard features sleeping tips from around the world. The radio program, Postcards from Abroad, brings you 60 seconds of quirky cultural tidbits. This collaboration between KPR and the Area Studies Centers at the University of Kansas features guest writers from different centers. Listen to already broadcast Postcards from Abroad.


Film Screening. Humanities and Honors Program WWI Film Series: Lawrence of Arabia
Sunday, October 2, 1:00-5:00 pm | The Jay (1st floor), Kansas Union

Lawrence of Arabia, the 1962 epic film depicts T. E. Lawrence's experiences in the Arabian Peninsula during World War I. The film describes his emotional struggles with the personal violence inherent in war, his own identity, and his divided allegiance between his native Britain and its army and his new-found comrades within the Arabian Desert tribes. The film won seven Academy Awards. This event is part of KU’s World War I Centennial Commemoration, coordinated by the European Studies Program.


SUA International Films Festival
Monday, Sept 26-Friday, Sept 30, 7-9 pm | Kansas Union

Enjoy films from around the world at our week-long International Film Festival. Featuring films that take place in Mongolia, Argentina, Mali, France, and Afghanistan! Mon: The Cave of the Yellow Dog, Tues: Wild Tales, Wed: Timbuktu, Thurs: Intouchables, Fri: Sonita.


Opportunities with the US Department of State: Internships and Consular Fellows Program
Monday, September 19, 2:00-3:00 pm | Centennial Room, Kansas Union (6th floor)

Joan Hutfles will share information and answer your questions about internships and the Consular Fellows Program. The US Department of State offers opportunities for diverse, culturally-aware, adaptable and strategic problem-solvers interested in learning about US foreign policy and diplomacy. Participation in these programs will enable you to acquire lifelong skills and position you for a public service career. For all majors! Some internship deadlines are coming up in October so this session is very timely. Sponsored by Center for East Asian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, European Studies Program, Jayhawks Without Borders Student Club, Kansas African Studies Center, KU School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, KU’s University Career Center, Middle East Studies Program. Earn credit for GAP.


Coffee with a Diplomat
Monday, September 19, 10:30 am-12:00 pm | The Jay/Spare Room, Kansas Union (1st floor)

Grab a cup of coffee and chat with Joan Hutfles, a diplomat with 17 years’ experience! Learn about career opportunities with the US Department of State during this informal session. For all majors! Complimentary coffee will be provided. Sponsored by Center for East Asian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, European Studies Program, Jayhawks Without Borders Student Club, Kansas African Studies Center, KU School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, KU’s University Career Center, Middle East Studies Program. Earn credit for GAP.


SUA Sounds of the World: Duo Kaspiana
Friday, September 16, 7:00-8:00 pm | Malott Room, Kansas Union

SUA presents a new series event consisting of concerts called, Sounds of the World. Each concert will represent a different part of the world, offering an opportunity to learn more about music from each respective culture. DuoKaspiana combines the talents of Turkmen pianist Maya Tuylieva and Azerbaijani violinist Diana Seitz.


CREES Brownbag: Bosnia & Herzegovina’s Euro-Atlantic Aspirations post-BREXIT
Tuesday, September 13, 12:00-1:00 pm | 318 Bailey Hall

Ken Zurcher (Foreign Service Officer, US Embassy, Sarajevo) presents at our informal forum on general topics related to Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia. From the arts and literature to political science and current events, the weekly CREES Brownbag continues to educate and inform all those interested in this diverse and dynamic area of the world.


Kansas Museum of History: Do Your Bit—Knit!
Stacie Petersen, registrar, The National World War I Museum and Memorial
Friday, September 9, 6:30 pm | Kansas Museum of History (6425 SW 6th Ave, Topeka)

Thousands of people unable to serve in the military during World War I picked up their needles and knitted for loved ones and their nations. Stacie Petersen addresses the history of knitting during the Great War. 


CREES Brownbag: “Dynamics and Implications of the Failed Coup in Turkey,” Michael Wuthrich
Tuesday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 pm | 318 Bailey Hall

Michael Wuthrich (CGIS, REES) presents at our informal forum on general topics related to Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia. From the arts and literature to political science and current events, the weekly CREES Brownbag continues to educate and inform all those interested in this diverse and dynamic area of the world.


Global Headlines: BREXIT
Monday, August 29, 4:00-5:30 pm
Kansas Room, Kansas Union            

In a referendum held on June 23, 2016, the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union. KU’s European Studies Program presents a panel discussion with three KU faculty experts to discuss the vote's significance for the UK and its political and economic impact on the European Union.

Panelists include:

  • Victor Bailey, Charles W. Battey Distinguished Professor of Modern British History and Director, Hall Center for the Humanities
  • Robert Rohrschneider, Sir Robert Worcester Distinguished Professor of Political Science
  • Felix Meschke, Associate Professor, School of Business -- Finance

The session will be moderated by Lorie A. Vanchena, Associate Professor, Germanic Languages & Literatures, and Academic Director, European Studies Program. This event is part of the new Global Headlines series organized by KU’s Center for Global & International Studies. The goal of this series is to create an opportunity for people to digest and decipher major news stories and issues as they occur. Cosponsored by the European Studies Program, Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies.

Note: We call your attention to a second Brexit program. CREES will host Bosnia & Herzegovina’s Euro-Atlantic Aspirations post-BREXIT, presented by Ken Zurcher (Foreign Service Officer, US Embassy, Sarajevo) on Tuesday, September 13, 12-1pm, Bailey 318.


Panel Presentation. The Great War at 100: The KU WWI Centennial Commemoration
Final Friday, August 26, 7:00 pm | Watkins Museum of History (1047 Massachusetts St)

Join us downtown on this Final Friday to learn about how KU is commemorating WWI. Listen to experts as they discuss espionage and classified advertising during the war.

  • Commemorating WWI at KU. Lorie Vanchena, Academic Director of the European Studies Program, Chair of KU WWI Centennial Commemoration and Associate Professor, Germanic Languages & Literatures
  • From French Motorists to Suspicious Neighbors: Spy-Mania in Cracow in the Early Months of the Great War, Nathan Wood, Associate Professor, History
  • Normalcy Wanted: Classified Advertisements for Pianos and Marriage during the Great War in Habsburg Galicia, Drew Burks, PhD candidate, History, University of Kansas

Sponsored by the Watkins Museum of History.


30 Years (Or 30,000): Seven Spectral Stories about Chernobyl
Thursday, April 28, 7:00 pm
Malott Room, Kansas Union

This talk will interpret the Chernobyl nuclear accident of 1986 within a series of widely varying spatio-temporal reference frames, including histories of the Soviet Union, its growth and eventual collapse; relations between Ukraine, Ukrainians, and their neighbors; militarized “black sites” and Cold War (and post-Cold War) conspiracy theories; nuclear power and the anti-nuclear movement; scientific experiments on biotic populations; zombie and “stalker” cultures and subcultures; and the Anthropocene and its theorization. Presented by Adrian Ivakhiv, Professor of Environmental Thought and Culture at the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont. Sponsored by Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Environmental Studies Program, Center for Global & International Studies.


World War I as Artistic Crucible: The Early Music of Georges Auric (1899–1983)
Thursday, April 21, 3:30-5:00 pm
Watson Library, Third Floor West, Haricombe Gallery

Colin Roust, Assistant Professor of Music in the School of Music, will discuss portions of his forthcoming book, The Music and Politics of Georges Auric. This talk  focuses on how Auric’s experience of World War I shaped his political attitudes and artistic aesthetic from his wartime works to the film scores that he composed for Jean Cocteau’s Le sang d’un poète and René Clair’s A nous, la liberté! The talk will also include a performance of Auric’s Huit poèmes de Jean Cocteau, given by KU School of Music graduate students Amelia Lawson and Neal Long.


2016 Security Mini-Conference: Russia along NATO’s Borders
Friday, April 15, 2:00-6:00 pm
Kansas Union, Alderson Auditorium

The afternoon will feature a keynote address by Adrian Karatnycky on the conflict in Ukraine and its broader implications, as well as two panels, the first focused on several real or potential conflict zones, and the second on the drivers of Russian security policy. Speakers at the event include:

·        Adrian Karatnycky, Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council’s Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center

·        Roger Kangas, Dean, Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies

·        Mariya Omelicheva, Associate Professor, KU Political Science

·        Aric Toler, Consultant, Bellingcat

·        David Trimbach, PhD Student, KU Geography

·        Thomas Wilhelm, Director, Foreign Military Studies Office

Sponsored by University of Kansas Office of Graduate Military Studies, Center for Global and International Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, and Department of Political Science. Free and open to the public. Earn credit for GAP.


Margins and Marginalities: Chimères Conference 2016
Saturday, April 9, 9:00 am-5:00 pm |
Max Kade Center, 1134 W 11th St, Lawrence

KU Department of French and Italian presents their 2016 conference. Keynote Speaker will be Russell Goulbourne, King’s College, London. The conference is free and open to the public. We encourage anyone interested to attend. Sponsored by European Studies Program, Germanic Languages & Literatures, Max Kade Center, EGARC, Dept. of Art History, Dept. of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, The Hall Center for the Humanities, Dept. of Philosophy, The Office of Graduate Studies, Dept. of Classics, School of Languages, Literatures, & Cultures, Dept. of Slavic Languages & Literatures, Dept. of Spanish & Portuguese.


A Minor Apocalypse: Everyday Life in Warsaw during the First World War
Everyday Lives on the Eastern Front: WWI Lecture Series 2015-16
Robert Blobaum, Eberly Professor of History, West Virginia University
Tuesday, March 29, 7:00 pm | Kansas Union, Alderson Auditorium
Followed by a book-signing.

The vast majority of Warsaw's Polish and Jewish residents experienced an existential crisis caused by the collapse of the local economy and the military requisitioning of basic resources, first by the Russians and then on a much larger scale by the Germans. Nearly universal shortages of growing severity and their impacts on public health and inter-communal relations—to which the fall of empires have been attributed—will be compared to shortages documented for cities such as Berlin and Vienna, thus situating Warsaw's wartime experience within a larger European context.


Eastern Front 1914-1918: An Exploration of the Conflict
Exhibition Opening, Reception and Presentation
Friday, March 4
Watson Library, Third Floor West (1425 Jayhawk Boulevard)

The University of Kansas Libraries invite you to the opening reception for an exhibition featuring collections and campus scholarship that advance the study of the Eastern Front of World War I.

5:30 pm | Cocktail reception 

6:30 pm | Presentation: “Why Study WWI?” by Lorie Vanchena, Associate Professor, Germanic Languages & Literatures 

RSVP to Jennifer Muse by February 20: 785-864-8961 jmuse@ku.edu 

The Unvanquished
Tuesday, March 1, 7:00 pm
Kansas Union, Woodruff Auditorium

Touched by War, photographer will give Keynote Common Book Lecture. James Nachtwey has documented conflicts and social issues around the world, including Afghanistan, Bosnia, Chechnya and Rwanda. He will present “The Unvanquished” as part of the KU Common Book series, which this year features Ernest Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms.”


The Russian Army in the Great War: The Eastern Front, 1914-1917
Everyday Lives on the Eastern Front: WWI Lecture Series 2015-16
David Stone, Professor, Strategy and Policy, U.S. Naval War College
Thursday, February 25, 7:00 pm | Hall Center for the Humanities
Followed by a book-signing.

The Russian Army’s experience of World War I on the Eastern Front has long been overshadowed, both by the much better known war in the trenches on the Western Front, and by the subsequent development of a new Soviet Army. Understanding how the Russian Army fought in World War I provides us not only with a new perspective on the First World War, but also gives us a much better sense of how and why the war shaped the Soviet Army and the new Soviet state. Followed by a reception and book-signing.

Dr. David R. Stone is the author of The Russian Army in the Great War: The Eastern Front, 1914-1917, published by the University Press of Kansas (2015), as well as numerous other books and articles on Russian / Soviet history. He received his Ph.D from Yale University and taught 1999-2015 at Kansas State University, where he was Pickett Professor of Military History. Series Co-Sponsors: KU Common Book, Big XII Faculty Fellowship Program, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Department of History, Dole Institute of Politics, European Studies Program, Hall Center for the Humanities, Humanities Program, Max Kade Center, Office of Graduate Military Programs, University Honors Program, University Press of Kansas. This program is part of the University of Kansas Centennial Commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs:www.european.ku.edu/events and kuwwi.com.


Is Identity Portable? A Talk by Frédéric Brenner, Photographer and Social Anthropologist
Monday, February 22, 4:00-6:00 pm
Kansas Union, Malott, 6th floor

What happens when home is no longer home? Social anthropologist and acclaimed photographer Frédéric Brenner has explored this question for over 30 years. Diaspora: Homelands in Exile is a photographic chronicle of hundreds of Jews in 40 countries over a period of 25 years, seeking to understand what happens to a people when they leave their native land. Are they at home or strangers in a strange land? Does their culture melt, evaporate or intensify?  What ties a people to their heritage? This event is sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program and the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City.


The Impact of WWI on the Nursing Profession
Saturday February 20, 1-4:30 pm
National WWI Museum (JC Nichols Auditorium)

Presented by the KU School of Nursing and the University of Kansas Medical Center. World War I saw a dramatic expansion of the United States Army’s Nursing Corps from approximately 400 in 1917 to over 21,000 nurses by the conclusion of the war in 1918. This extraordinary growth is evidence of nursing’s dedication to care for people and was a milestone in the evolving history of the nursing profession. This half-day symposium includes presentations by experts on the experiences of nurses in WWI and the lasting legacy for the profession. The presenters are experts in the history of nursing of this era. The public and medical professionals are welcome to attend for free. Please register and learn more at https://www.theworldwar.org/learn/medical-history-and-wwi-symposia.


New Scholarship Opportunity for Students to Study Abroad in Berlin, Paris or Rome
Deadline: Monday, February 15

In partnership with CIEE, KU Study Abroad will award grants for CIEE’s Global Institutes:

•         Berlin, Germany – 2 awards of $5,000 each

•         Paris, France – 1 award of $5,000

•         Rome, Italy – 1 award of $5,000

These programs offer students the opportunity to complete 18 credit hours in Business; Communications, Journalism and New Media; Political Science and International Relations; French, German, or Italian Language and Literature; or the Health Sciences. No prior language experience is necessary; each program offers multi-level language courses for students wishing to pursue intensive language study. In addition, students can opt to complete an internship, engage in directed research, or participate in a service-learning project. Detailed information can be found at the CIEE Global Institutes website. Students may be directed to contact Ingrid Horton (idhorton@ku.edu) for questions about the Paris and Rome programs or Jenna Hunter-Skidmore (jmhunter@ku.edu) for the Berlin program. 


Internship Programs with the US Department of State
Wednesday, February 10, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
Kansas Union, Kansas Room

Robert Andrew, Diplomat in Residence, will share information and answer your questions about internship opportunities with the US Department of State. The US Department of State offers internship for diverse, culturally-aware, adaptable and strategic problem-solvers interested in learning about US foreign policy and diplomacy. Participation in these internship programs will enable you to acquire lifelong skills and position you for a public service career. Sponsored by Center for East Asian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Kansas African Studies Center, KU’s University Career Center, KU School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, European Studies Program, Middle East Studies Program, South Asian Studies. Earn credit for GAP.


Coffee with a Diplomat
Wednesday, February 10, 9:00-10:30 am
Kansas Union, Pine Room

Grab a cup of coffee and chat with Robert Andrew, Diplomat in Residence! Learn about career opportunities with the US Department of State during this informal session. Complimentary coffee will be provided. Sponsored by Center for East Asian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Kansas African Studies Center, KU’s University Career Center, KU School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, European Studies Program, Middle East Studies Program, South Asian Studies. Earn credit for GAP.


International Jayhawk Festival
Thursday, February 4, 4:00-8:00 pm
Daisy Hill Commons (1620 Engel Road)

Are you ready to become a global Jayhawk? Join SUA Cultural Programming at the inaugural International Jayhawk Festival! FREE food, games, art, and activities—plus the first 300 attendees will receive a free t-shirt! Learn about academic programs, languages, study/intern abroad, cultural activities, global career resources and student clubs. Meet representatives from over 30 international centers, programs, and student organizations on campus, including the Office of Study Abroad, the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, KU’s five Area Studies centers, and the Office of Multicultural Affairs. Play games, grab a snack, and view the award-winning artwork from the SUA Art Contest: World Through Us. Free entry with KU ID. Submit your artwork by Feb. 2nd and see details here: http://suaevents.com/world-through-us-art-contest. If you are in need of an accommodation due to a disability, please submit your request at least 7 business days in advance of the event to Michelle Compton. Email: studentunionactivities@gmail.comPhone (785) 864-7469. TTY: 711.


Global Food For Thought: Identity, Remembrance, and Repertoire: The Jewish Kulturbund Theatre in Nazi Berlin
Thursday, February 4, 12:00-1:00 pm
318 Bailey Hall

Rebecca Rovit, Department of Theatre, will address the challenges of documenting and re-presenting the complicated history and shifting identity of an all-Jewish theatre within Nazi Germany. Using Siegfried Kühn’s film, The Actress (Die Schauspielerin, GDR, 1988), Professor Rovit will draw attention to the liberties that theatre- and film-makers have taken when representing the Jewish Kulturbund. Sponsored by the Center for Global & International Studies and European Studies Program.  A light lunch will be served. FREE. Earn credit for GAP.


Postcards from Abroad: Jewish Languages
Wednesday, February 3, 8:58 pm and Saturday, February 6, 1:04 pm
Tune in to 91.5 FM KPR in Lawrence

Next week’s postcard features Jewish languages. Learn about Hebrew, Ladino (also known as Judezmo) and Yiddish. The radio program, Postcards from Abroad, brings you 60 seconds of quirky cultural tidbits. This collaboration between KPR and the Area Studies Centers at the University of Kansas features guest writers from different centers. Listen to already broadcast Postcards from Abroad: http://audioboom.com/postcardsfromabroad


Sacred and Profane: P.P. Pasolini's La Ricotta
Tuesday, January 26, 5:00-6:30 pm
Max Kade Center for German-American Studies

Join us for a screening of La Ricotta, an episode of the film Ro.Go.Pa.G. featuring Orson Welles. The film was written and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini, an acclaimed Italian intellectual, poet, novelist, essayist, and director. The screening will be followed by a discussion led by Columbia University’s Prof. Paolo Valesio, a poet, novelist, scholar, and one of the most influential Italianists of his generation. Sponsored by the Department of French and Italian, and the European Studies Program. Earn GAP credit.


Common Book (A Farewell to Arms) Discussion
Friday, January 22, 1:00-3:00 pm
Spencer Research Library

Office of First Year Experience will host a Common Book (A Farewell to Arms) discussion for mid-year transfers and new students in the Spencer Research Library. 


"Working in Foreign Policy": Council on Foreign Relations Academic Conference Call
Wednesday, December 2, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
318 Bailey Hall

Join us as we Skype with Rachel B. Vogelstein, senior fellow and director of the Women and Foreign Policy program at CFR. She will discuss her experience working in foreign policy and offer suggestions for how students can prepare for careers in public service, global affairs, and policy research.


CREES Brownbag: Elections in Turkey
Tuesday, December 1, 12:00-1:00pm
318 Bailey Hall

Join Mike Wuthrich, Academic Director of Global & International Studies program, as he discusses Turkish elections.


Internationalize Your Mobile Devices
Thursday, November 19, 10:00 am-12:00 pm
EGARC (4070 Wescoe)

As part of the celebration of International Education Week, EGARC will be partnering with KU IT to help students, faculty and staff “internationalize” their mobile devices. Services will include the installation of foreign language keyboards as well as grammar and spellcheckers for Microsoft Office products; we will also field general IT questions, including those about free and discounted software available through KU IT (http://technology.ku.edu/software).


International Trivia Night
Wednesday, November 18, 5:30 pm
The Jay, Kansas Union

KU staff, students and faculty and the general public are welcome to participate. Organize a team of up to eight people. Register your team by Nov. 17 at international.ku.edu/international-trivia-night. Individuals are welcome to come to the event to be assigned to a team, if space is available. Email oip@ku.edu with questions.


Internship Fair
Wednesday, November 18, 3:00-6:00 pm
Kansas Union Ballroom

The College of Liberal Arts & Sciences is co-sponsoring the Internship Fair with the UCC. Students are encouraged to attend this networking event to learn about internship opportunities. Employers will be promoting their fall, spring, and summer opportunities. Students should dress professionally, bring copies of their resumes, and be ready to make a great first impression! Click Internship Fair for more info about the services available before and during the fair and the list of attending employers. Additionally, the day before (11/17) will be a “One Stop Prep Shop” event which will include a number of important tips and resources to help students prepare for the fair.


Giacomo Leopardi and the Uncomfortable Truth: The Zibaldone as a Pre-modern Hypertext
Wednesday, November 11, 5:00-6:30 pm
Spencer Research Library, North Gallery, 1450 Poplar Ln

Professor Franco D’Intino, University of Rome – Sapienza, and Honorary Senior Research Fellow and Director of the Leopardi Centre at the University of Birmingham, UK, discusses the life and legacy of poet Giacomo Leopardi through his notebooks published in Italian in 1898 under the name “Zibaldone”, which loosely translates to “miscellany” or “hodgepodge”. D’Intino served as co-editor of the 2013 English translation of this monumental work. Spanning some 4,500 pages, Leopardi’s writings reflect his radically modern ideas about religion, philosophy, language, history, anthropology, astronomy, literature, poetry, and love. The lecture includes a bilingual reading from the "Zibaldone". A reception will follow. This lecture is presented in conjunction with a screening of the biopic film Leopardi (Il giovane favoloso) on November 9 at 7 PM, Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts St. Sponsored by Department of French and Italian, Spencer Museum of Art, Spencer Research Library, Hall Center for the Humanities, and European Studies Program.


Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers in the World War I Era

An Evening with Chad Williams, Associate Professor of African and Afro-American Studies, Brandeis University

Tuesday, November 10, 7:00 pm

Spooner Hall, KU Commons

 

For the 380,000 African American soldiers who fought in WWI, Woodrow Wilson's charge to make the world 'safe for democracy' carried life-or-death meaning. Chad L. Williams reveals the central role of African American soldiers in the global conflict and how they, along with others, committed to fighting for democracy. Using a diverse range of sources, Williams reclaims the legacy of African American soldiers and connects their history to issues such as obligations of citizenship, combat, labor, diaspora and internationalism, homecoming and racial violence, 'New Negro' militancy, and African American memories of WWI. (from UNC Press)

 


Film: Leopardi (Il Giovane Favoloso)
Monday, November 9, 7:00 – 9:30 pm
Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts St

Leopardi (Il giovane favoloso), a biopic directed by Mario Martone, tells the story of the life and work of poet Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837). Hailed as a literary genius and the finest Italian writer since Petrarch, Leopardi was an innovative, radical thinker. The film was selected to compete for the Golden Lion at the 71st Venice International Film Festival in 2014, and also screened at the Toronto International Film Festival the same year. Italian with English subtitles. 143 min. Admission is free and open to the public. The screening is organized in conjunction with a lecture by Franco D’Intino on Leopardi's "Zibaldone" or notebooks of miscellaneous writings, scheduled to take place November 11, from 5-6 pm at the Spencer Research Library. Sponsored by Department of French and Italian, Spencer Museum of Art, and European Studies Program.


Exhibit: The Second Battlefield: Nurses in the First World War

Opens Tuesday, November 3

National World War 1 Museum, Kansas City

Nursing played a crucial role during the First World War. Emergency medical practices evolved enormously during the war years (1914-1918) and thousands more medical workers were involved than in previous wars. This exhibition, organized by Spencer Museum curator Stephen Goddard, is drawn primarily from a gift of more than 3,000 works donated to the Spencer Museum of Art by Eric Gustav Carlson. On view November 3-March 6.


More than Binding Men's Wounds: Women's Wartime Nursing
in Russia during the Great War
Everyday Lives on the Eastern Front:  WWI Lecture Series 2015-16
Laurie Stoff, Senior Honors Faculty Fellow, Barrett Honors College, Arizona State University
Monday, November 2, 7:00 pm
Spooner Hall, KU Commons

 

Although the female nurse has been a fixture in modern warfare, she is often overlooked. The nurse’s role was especially important in World War I, when thousands of female medical personnel were required for the treatment of millions of soldiers and civilians. In Russia, nurses were indispensable to the war effort, serving on the front lines and often assuming public leadership roles. These nurses, far from merely binding wounds, provided vital services that put them squarely in traditionally masculine territory, both literally and figuratively.

 

Sponsored by: KU Common Book, Big XII Faculty Fellowship Program, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Department of History, Dole Institute of Politics, European Studies Program, Hall Center for the Humanities, Humanities Program, Max Kade Center, Office of Graduate Military Programs, University Honors Program, University Press of Kansas. This program is part of the University of Kansas Centennial Commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs: www.european.ku.edu/events  and kuwwi.com. Followed by a reception and book-signing.


Jayhawks Without Borders: LGBT Issues in Poland
Friday, October 23, 11:00am-12:00 pm
318 Bailey Hall

Mr. Izienicki will discuss LGBT issues in Poland, detailing the struggle for civil rights in the European country and what the political arena looks like today. Jayhawks Without Borders (JWB) club is open to any student interested in international studies.


Recycling the Disabled: Army, Medicine, and Modernity in the First World War
Everyday Lives on the Eastern Front:  WWI Lecture Series 2015-16
Heather Perry, Associate Professor, Dept. of History, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Thursday, October 22, 7:00 pm | Spooner Hall, KU Commons
 

This talk will examine the 'medical organization' of Imperial Germany for total war. Faced with mounting casualties and a growing labor shortage, German military, industrial, and governmental officials turned to medical experts for assistance in the total mobilization of society. Through an investigation of developments in rehabilitation medicine, prosthetic technology, military medical organization and the cultural history of disability, Heather Perry will discuss how the pressures of warfare transformed not only medical ideas and treatments for injured soldiers, but also social and cultural expectations of the disabled body in Germany as well as in other belligerent nations. Sponsored by: KU Common Book, Big XII Faculty Fellowship Program, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Department of History, Dole Institute of Politics, European Studies Program, Hall Center for the Humanities, Humanities Program, Max Kade Center, Office of Graduate Military Programs, University Honors Program, University Press of Kansas. This program is part of the University of Kansas Centennial Commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs: www.european.ku.edu/events  and kuwwi.com.


National Elections in Turkey: Here We Go Again?
Wednesday, September 23, 7:00 pm
Kansas Union, Centennial Room

Join F. Michael Wuthrich, Assistant Professor and Director of the Global & International Studies Program at KU, as he discusses the critical upcoming elections in Turkey in light of the “ghosts of elections past,” the forces, patterns and people that will help us make sense of what we will see before and after November 1st when the citizens of Turkey go once again to the polls. Sponsored by the Global & International Studies Program, European Studies Program, Middle East Studies Program, Department of Political Science, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies. Earn credit for GAP. Followed by a book-signing.


Jayhawks Without Borders Meeting
Friday, September 4, 11:00am-12:00pm
318 Bailey Hall
 

Join Jayhawks Without Borders, KU’s club for students interested in international & area studies, for a beginning-of-semester icebreaker. Bring a friend!  


EXHIBIT: Spencer Museum of Art
World War I & The End of Empires
Gallery 401, Empire of Things / On view through April 5, 2015
WWI with its new machines of destruction brought about a seismic shift in human consciousness. WWI forever changed our notions of modernity and realigned the political map in ways that continue to impact us today.
 
The Second Battlefield: Nurses in the First World War
On view through April 5, 2015
Nursing played a crucial role in WWI. Emergency medical practices evolved greatly from 1914-1918 and 1000s more nurses served than in previous wars. This exhibition is drawn primarily from gift from Eric Gustav Carlson.

EXHIBIT: Watkins Museum of History
1047 Massachusetts Street, Lawrence / On view through March 2015
Doing Our Part:  Lawrence During the Great War
This exhibition honors area residents who served in the military and supported the war effort. It shares stories of men who served overseas, life on the homefront in KS, and local memorials honoring those lost in the conflict.

Attend the 18th Annual International Congress of the Mediterranean Studies Association 
University of Athens, Greece, May 27-30, 2015
The final program and registration information can be found on the MSA Website: https://www.mediterraneanstudies.org/
Mark your calendars for future Mediterranean Studies Association meetings! They will be held in Palermo in 2016, and in Malta in 2017.


Oak Hill Cemetery Tour: Sharing Stories of Local Veterans who Served from 1861-1975
Sunday, May 3, 2:00-4:00 pm
Oak Hill Cemetery, 1605 Oak Hill Avenue

The Watkins will celebrate the 150th anniversary of Oak Hill Cemetery and will honor local veterans who have served our nation from the Civil War to Vietnam. 2015 marks the sesquicentennial of Oak Hill Cemetery and the golden anniversary of the eternal flame placed in the Veteran’s Section at Oak Hill in 1965. This walking tour is presented by a dedicated committee that believes Oak Hill Cemetery has always been a very special place in our community and that untold stories should be shared with the public. Eight stations along a winding walking path will provide glimpses into war and service. Come stroll the cemetery and be intrigued by the presenters as they share stories about local heroes and heroines. This will include the story of Minnie Scott who served as a nurse in France during WWI. Advance reservations suggested. Contact the Watkins Museum of History at 785-841-4109 or visit their website for registration information via PayPal. Cost: $5/$10 or $15 day of the tour. Youth under 17 years and younger are free. Come prepared to walk.


Envisioning Transatlantic Partnership for the 21st Century: What's Next on the Horizon for EU-US Economic Relations?
Thursday, April 30, reception at 5:30 pm and program at 6:15 pm
Union Station in Kansas City, MO

This discussion will be presented by Miriam Sapiro, Nonresident Senior Fellow Brookings Institution and Marjorie Chorlins, Vice President for European Affairs from the US Chamber of Commerce. Miriam Sapiro is a Nonresident Senior Fellow in the Global Economy and Development program at the Brookings Institution. She served as Deputy U.S. Trade Representative from 2009-2014, where she led negotiations and enforcement with countries in Europe, the Middle East, North Africa and the Americas. She has over 25 years of experience in the private sector and government, including at the National Security Council and the U.S. State Department. Marjorie Chorlins is Vice President for European Affairs at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, where she is responsible for developing, promoting, and executing US-based programs and policies related to trade and investment in Europe. With more than 25 years of experience in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors, she has focused on forging consensus among competing points of view. She has represented the U.S. government in multilateral trade negotiations, advocated in support of global sales, and consulted with multinational corporations on corporate responsibility. Since KU is an educational partner of the IRC, faculty, students, and staff may attend for FREE! Register online: www.irckc.org/event/EU-US-Econ


Things Soldiers Carried Home (A Preservation Workshop)
Saturday, April 25, 9:30-11:30 am
Watkins Museum of History

The Watkins Museum of History will host a workshop to assist families to preserve military uniforms, medals, photos, letters, etc. The goal is to highlight the importance of preserving artifacts that are personal yet represent our community’s role in our nation's military history. Military uniforms and a number of artifacts will be on display during the workshop and during the Final Friday on April 26 in downtown Lawrence. The workshop will include information on caring for clothing and military uniforms, photos, film, video, letters, diaries, posters, and official records. FREE. This workshop is funded in part by a grant from the Kansas Humanities Council.


See/Saw Film Festival
Friday, April 24-Sunday, April 26
Lawrence Public Library

See/Saw centers on exhibiting, disrupting and renegotiating constructions of children and young people who come from historically underserved and marginalized backgrounds. Following each film screening, we will hold a panel discussion with members of the KU and Lawrence community. The festival is free and open to the public. While the See/Saw Film Festival was primarily coordinated by graduate students in the KU Department of Special Education and leadership members of the Kansas University Professionals for Disability, the event would not be possible without assistance from the following organizations, departments, and centers. These sponsors have been pivotal in donating time, energy, wisdom, and funds to the festival. Co-sponsored by the Center for Global & International Studies. Many amazing films will be shown, including:
Song of the Sea: A breathtakingly gorgeous, hand-drawn masterpiece. Based on the Irish legend of the Selkies. For program information, see http://seesawfilmfest.com/program/

Jayhawks Without Borders: Global Internships
Friday, April 24, 11:00am-12:00 pm
318 Bailey Hall

Mary Beth Duda will talk to us about internship possibilities overseas. She participated in an "internship abroad" that also counted for major credit last summer. She went to Dublin and worked for a non-profit organization there that focused on developmental work in a number of sub-Saharan African countries--a very global experience! Find more information on study abroad programs and internships at the University of Kansas here at the KU Office of Study Abroad website: http://studyabroad.ku.edu/. Jayhawks Without Borders (JWB) club is open to any student interested in international studies. JWB Club meets weekly with fun and entertaining activities that help increase global awareness and action. Sponsored by Jayhawks Without Borders International Studies Club. Come join us!


World War I and Modern Art
Friday, April 17
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak St, Kansas City, MO

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow…” 100 years ago, in Flanders fields, the world changed forever. Soldiers who were poets, novelists and artists crawled through mud in the trenches, breathed poison gas on the battlefields. After the war, they reflected on their experiences and transformed human suffering into literature and art. The Nelson-Atkins has organized an exhibition that explores the impact of the Great War on art and artists. This tour will look at paintings, drawings, photographs, sculpture and decorative art that show artists emerging from the devastation and creating new directions into the future. Artists represented in the exhibition include Brancusi, Braque, Duchamp, O’Keeffe, Monet, Steichen, Stieglitz and Ray. Alan Lubert and other docents will direct this one-of-a-kind tour. Schedule: 9 am – Motor coach departs Osher Institute, 10:15 am – Museum tour begins, 3:15 pm – Coach departs for Lawrence. $50 fee includes tour, lunch in the Rozzelle Court Restaurant and transportation OR $35 fee includes tour and lunch (no transportation). Please register at http://osher.ku.edu/register or call 877-404-5823 toll free.


The International Criminal Court from Nuremberg to Kampala and Beyond
Wednesday, April 15, 9:45 am
Burge Union, Courtside Room

The School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures is hosting this presentation by the Ambassador of Slovenia, H. E. Dr. Bozo Cerar. The Ambassador's talk examines the evolution of international criminal law and its enforcement - starting at the Nuremberg trials and expanding into current-day issues. There will be time for questions following the Ambassador's presentation. Co-Sponsored by The School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures, KU School of Business, KU School of Law, The Hall Center for the Humanities, Center for Global & International Studies, European Studies Program, and Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies.


Communism through the Eyes of a Child
Monday, April 13, 7:00 pm
318 Bailey Hall

An evening with Polish graphic novelist Marzena Sowa and French illustrator and cartoonist Sylvain Savoia. Sowa and Savoia are the authors of the autobiographical comic series "Marzi" depicting Sowa's childhood and adolescence in communist Poland in the 1980s. The English translation came out under the title "Marzi. A Memoir: in 2011 by DC/Vertigo. KU Slavic Department Professor Svetlana Vassileva-Karagyozova will introduce the author and illustrator, and lead an informal discussion open to anyone interested in East European history, Communism, graphic novels & illustration. Sponsored by KU Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures, Department of French & Italian, European Studies Program, Center for Global & International Studies and Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies


Jayhawks Without Borders: Global Hotspots, Ukraine & Crimea
Friday, April 10, 11:00am-12:00 pm
318 Bailey Hall

Austin Charron, doctoral candidate in the KU Geography Department will give a general talk on Ukraine. The talk will include some historical background as well as research and cognitive mapping conducted by Austin as a Fulbrighter in Crimea. Jayhawks Without Borders (JWB) club is open to any student interested in international studies. JWB Club meets weekly with fun and entertaining activities that help increase global awareness and action. Sponsored by Jayhawks Without Borders International Studies Club. Come join us!


Language Contacts between German and Slovene
Tuesday, April 7, 1:00 pm
Watson Library, Room 455

Presented by Uni.ao.Prof. Dr. Alja Lipavic Oštir, Katedra Germanistiky, Filozoficka fakulta, Univerzita Sv. Cirila a Metoda, Trnava, Slovakia (The University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Trnava, Slovakia). Sponsored by KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures, Center for Global & International Studies, European Studies Program, and Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies.


CREES Friday Night at the Kino (cinema)
Last Waltz in Sarajevo / Belle epoque ili poslednji valcer u Sarajevu
Friday, April 3, 7:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall


Last Waltz in Sarajevo is set in the last days of the period Europe called “La Belle Epoque”, between the years 1910 and the start of World War I in 1914. Against the backdrop of love, espionage, intrigue and a cabaret, the film provides the social context for the start of WWI in Sarajevo. The film will be shown in Serbian with English subtitles. Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East Europe and Eurasian Studies. This program is part of the KU WWI Centennial Commemoration, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs at european.ku.edu and KUWWI.com.


The Goldenberg Duo: Music from Around the World
Tuesday, March 24, 2:00-3:00 PM

Spencer Museum of Art / Gallery 316


Susan Goldenberg, a violinist with the Kansas City Symphony and William Goldenberg, distinguished professor of piano at Northern Illinois University perform selections of classical and contemporary music, taking visitors of all ages on a journey across time and space. This year’s concert features works from World War I including Maurice Ravel’s Le Tombeau de Couperin, composed between 1914-17 and conceived as a memorial to friends who died fighting in the War, and work by Fritz Kreisler who served in the War. This concert is presented in conjunction with the KU WWI Centennial Commemoration, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Sponsored by the Kansas City Symphony Community Connections Initiative (CCI) and Spencer Museum of Art.


To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918
Monday, March 9, 7:30 pm 
KU Commons, Spooner Hall
 
World War I was supposed to be the “war to end all wars.” Over four long years, nations around the globe were sucked into the tempest, and millions of men died on the battlefields. To this day, the war stands as one of history’s most senseless spasms of carnage, defying rational explanation. To End All Wars focuses on the long-ignored moral drama of the war’s critics, alongside its generals and heroes. Join author, Adam Hochschild, Graduate School of Journalism, University of California Berkeley, as he explores pacifist movements, conscientious objectors, and deserters in WWI. The lecture will be followed by a book signing. Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities. This program is part of the KU WWI Centennial Commemoration, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs at european.ku.edu or KUWWI.com.

Jayhawks Without Borders: Translating as a Global Profession
Friday, March 6, 11:00 am-12:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall


Hiromi Morikawa, the director of the Mid-America Translators Association, will be hosting a discussion on her work as a translator and what being a translator is like today. This is a great opportunity for anyone interested in being a translator, linguistics, or international language! Jayhawks Without Borders (JWB) club is open to any student interested in international studies. JWB Club meets weekly with fun and entertaining activities that help increase global awareness and action. Sponsored by Jayhawks Without Borders International Studies Club. Come join us!


World War I and Modern Art
Friday, March 6

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak St, Kansas City, MO


100 years ago, in Flanders fields, soldier poets, novelists and artists crawled through muddy trenches and inhaled poison gas--experiences of human suffering they transferred into literature and art. The Nelson-Atkins exhibit, World War I and the Rise of Modernism explores the impact of WWI on art and artists. $50: tour, lunch, transportation; $35: tour, lunch. Register at http://osher.ku.edu/register or call 877-404-5823 toll free. Note: this tour will also be offered on Friday, April 17.


Global Food For Thought
A 4000 Year Old Pottery Workshop on Crete: Making Pottery Then, Thinking Pottery Today
Wednesday, March 4, 12:00-1:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall


Since 2011 John Younger (Classics, Jewish Studies) has been excavating a Minoan pottery workshop at Gournia in East Crete dating to about 1800 BCE. This is a huge establishment (about 4500 ft2) with three major buildings, a score of smaller ones, water installations, underground stone bins for storing clay, 10 wood-fired kilns, two yards empty of anything but shaved, flat bedrock, and at least three potter¹s stations (where potters made the pots). Out last digging season was in 2014, but we are now conducting study sessions. We will bring out of storage the objects we have excavated from the Workshop these past four years: the pots, the potter’s tools (ribs, fettling knives) and bats (disks that potters put their pots on), and the remnants of their hand-turned wheels. Younger has been taking pottery classes and talking to potters and kiln makers in order to understand how pots are made today with the goal of reconstructing the process of making pottery 4000 years ago, step by step, in the building we have excavated. A light lunch will be served. FREE. Earn credit for GAP.


The Santa Fe Division: The Kansas-Missouri National Guard in World War I
Tuesdays, March 3, 10 & 17, 7:00–9:00 pm

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, KU, 1515 Saint Andrews Dr, Lawrence


This course examines the merging of the Kansas and Missouri National Guards to form the 35th Division, their training and combat performance in France. The course will be led by Lieutenant Colonel Pendleton, retired from the U.S. Army. For more info or to register, visit http://osher.ku.edu/register or call 877-404-5823 toll free.


International Expo: The World and You at KU
Wednesday, February 25, 11:00 am-3:00 pm

Kansas Union, 4th floor lobby


The Expo features International Area Studies Centers, School of Languages, Global Awareness Program, Peace Corps, and more. Learn about international resources at KU: minors, majors & certificates, activities and performances, languages at KU, cultural events, study/intern abroad, scholarships, career resources, and student clubs. FREE FOOD! PRIZES! ENTERTAINMENT!
Sponsored by Center for East Asian Studies; Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies; Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies; Kansas African Studies Center; Center for Global & International Studies; Office of International Programs; Global Awareness Program; Fulbright; Office of Study Abroad; School of Languages, Literatures, & Cultures; Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center; Peace Corps; University Career Center; Coca-Cola Program; Undergraduate Studies.Earn credit for GAP.


Putinesque Politics in Erdogan's Turkey: CREES Brownbag
Thursday, February 12, 12:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall
Presenter: Sinan Ciddi, Executive Director of the Institute of Turkish Studies at Georgetown University, an expert on Turkish domestic politics and foreign policy


University Career Fair
Wednesday, February 11, 1:00-5:00 pm

Kansas Union, 4th and 5th Floors
Nearly 150 companies from a variety of industries will participate, offering internships and full-time job opportunities. Students from all majors and academic levels are encouraged to attend. A list of attending employers can be found at online or on the KU University Career Fair App.


SPECIAL EVENTS WITH DIPLOMAT, ROBERT ANDREW

Coffee with a Diplomat
Tuesday, February 10, 2:00-3:30 pm
Kansas Union, Alcove A (third floor, near Marketplace)
Grab a cup of coffee and chat with Robert Andrew, Diplomat in Residence! Learn about career opportunities with the US Department of State during this informal session. Complimentary coffee will be provided.
The Role of Language and Culture in the Foreign Service
Tuesday, February 10, 4:00 pm
Kansas Union, Big 12 Room
Diplomat in Residence, Robert Andrew, will speak about the importance of learning languages and culture, how it helped him in his career with the Foreign Service and how it can help students to pursue careers in the global arena.
Careers with the US Department of State
Tuesday, February 10, 7:00 pm
Kansas Union, Big 12 Room
Learn about a career opportunity unlike any other. Discover how you can have a global impact by joining the Foreign Service. Robert Andrew, Diplomat in Residence, will share information and answer your questions about career opportunities with the US Department of State.

All of these events are sponsored by Center for East Asian Studies, Center for Global & International Studies, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Kansas African Studies Center, KU’s University Career Center, European Studies Program, Middle East Studies Program, and South Asian Studies. Earn credit for GAP.


Job Talk: Candidate for Modern European History Position, History Department
Motherhood, Neighborhood, Nationhood: Immigrant Women, Apartment Life, and the Dynamics of Acculturation in Working-Class Paris, 1900-1940
Candidate: Nimisha Barton
Tuesday, February 10, 4:00 pm
330 Strong Hall

Reception to follow at the home of Professor Megan Greene, 1732 Mississippi
Meet & Greet with Faculty Members & Graduate Students: Tues, Feb 10, 1:45-3:30 pm in the department lounge, 3650 Wescoe


Job Talk: Candidate for Modern European History Position, History Department
Mobility in Twentieth-Century Europe: Bodies, Cultures, Environments
Candidate: Andrew Denning
Tuesday, February 3, 4:00 pm
Kansas Union, Kansas Room

Reception to follow at the home of Professor Megan Greene, 1732 Mississippi
Meet & Greet with Graduate Students: Tues, Feb 3, 2:15-3:30 pm in the department lounge, 3650 Wescoe
Meet & Greet with Faculty Members: Wed, Feb 4, 10:45-12:15 pm in the department lounge, 3650 Wescoe.


Job Talk: Candidate for Modern European History Position, History Department
Images. Matter: Nazi Germany’s Spatial (Dis)Order
Candidate: Anne Berg
Thursday, February 5, 4:00 pm
120 Snow Hall

Reception to follow at the home of Professor Sheyda Jahanbani and Jonathan Hagel, 2002 Hillview Road
Meet & Greet with Faculty Members: Thurs, Feb 5, 1:30-3:15 pm in the department lounge, 3650 Wescoe
Meet & Greet with Graduate Students: Fri, Feb 6, 1:30-2:30 pm in the department lounge, 3650 Wescoe.


Comedy in a Concentration Camp?
The Last Cyclist in Terezin with Naomi Pat
Saturday, December 6, 6:30
pm
354 Murphy Hall
Come to a pre-performance chat with “The Last Cyclist” playwright, Naomi Patz. Ms. Patz, D.J.R.E., reconstructed and reimagined “The Last Cyclist” from a cabaret of the same name written in the Terezin Ghetto in 1944. Patz has written several Jewish-themed, one-act plays. Along with nine books, she is also the author of “A Word to the Wise,” a dramatization of Jewish folk tales set to music. Performances of “The Last Cyclist” are December 6, 8-11 at 7:30 pm and December 7 at 2:30 pm. Tickets are on sale in the KU ticket offices. Sponsored by KU Jewish Studies Program, KU University Honors Program, European Studies Program, KU University Theatre, and Friends of the Theatre.


Vigil to Commemorate Veterans Day
Nov 8, 10:00 am to Nov 9, 11:00 am
Korean War, Vietnam War and Carillon/Campanile WWII Memorials
Memorial Drive, KU
The KU ROTC programs will conduct a 24-hour Veterans Day Vigil at three on-campus war memorials. Two Cadets in dress uniform will stand guard at each memorial throughout the 24-hour period. The start of the vigil will be marked by a bugler playing Taps at top of the Campanile. Cadets will be stationed at the Korean War, Vietnam War and Carillon/Campanile WWII Memorials. As a note, the Memorial Union, Memorial Stadium and Memorial Drive were constructed as memorials to those serving in WWI.


Film: Goodbye Lenin!
Sunday November 9, 2:00-4:00 pm
Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium

This weekend marks the 25th anniversary of the Fall of the Wall. Join us for a screening of Goodbye Lenin!, a coming-of-age adventure that blends the fall of Communism with the salient emotions of a family's love. In 1989, Christiane Kerner has lost her husband and is completely devoted to the Socialist East German state. A heart attack leaves her in a coma, and when she awakens eight months later, the Berlin Wall has fallen and it's a whole new world. To protect her from the shock, her son Alex hatches a plan to keep her in the dark. It's easy... all he has to do is turn back the hands of time.

Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, European Studies, Spencer Museum of Art, Global Awareness Program, Center for Global & International Studies, and Jayhawks Without Borders International Studies Club. Earn credit for GAP.

 

Taking Stock: 25 Years Since the Collapse of the Wall
Tuesday November 11, 12:00-1:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall
KU History Professor, Nathaniel Wood, will share his perspective on how the fall of the Berlin wall has shaped Eastern Europe over the past 25 years. This lecture is part of the regularly scheduled CREES Brownbag Lecture Series. Sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, European Studies, Spencer Museum of Art, Global Awareness Program, Center for Global & International Studies, and Jayhawks Without Borders International Studies Club. Earn credit for GAP.

Veterans Day Flag Ceremony

Tuesday, November 11, 4:00 pm

Strong Hall Lawn

KU ROTC’s annual Veterans Day Flag Ceremony will take place on the lawn in front of Strong Hall.  All ROTC programs will participate in the event which will last approximately 15 minutes.


Global Food For Thought

Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? State Border Characteristics and the Transnational Flow of Terrorist Violence

Wednesday, November 19, 12:00 pm

318 Bailey Hall

Join Nazli Avdan, KU professor in Political Science to learn more about terrorism. Until recently scholarship on borders has lacked systematic study of border management strategies. We redress this lacuna by leveraging a unique dataset on border barriers introduced in the 20th century. Specifically, we evaluate the effectiveness of fences as a defense against transnational terrorist attacks. While much of the literature on transnational terrorism has focused on variables such as democracy, development, and distance that are difficult for policy makers to manipulate, this analysis suggests that fencing may represent an effective policy tool for leaders to insulate their states from transnational terrorist attacks. A light lunch will be served. FREE. Earn credit for GAP.


 

Honoring Our Veterans: The Doughboys Write Home

 

Wednesday, November 5, 7:00 pm

Topeka Shawnee County Public Library

Marvin Auditorium 101BC, 1515 SW 10, Topeka

Join us to hear letters written by Shawnee County WWI Veterans and read by students from Topeka Collegiate School. Special musical tribute performed by an ensemble from the Topeka Symphony Orchestra.

 

 

Lecture

Literature, Intellectuals and Politics in Post-War Germany: The Impact of the Gruppe 47 on the Development of German Democracy

Per Øhrgaard 

Distinguished Visiting Max Kade Foundation Professor
Professor Emeritus, Copenhagen Business School
Board of Directors, Carlsberg Foundation

Tuesday, March 25, 7:00 pm

Max Kade Center (Sudler House)

 


 

 

Nation-Building in Turkey as Reflected in the Literature of the Gallipoli Campaign

Candan Kirişci, PhD, Department of Western Languages and Literatures, Bogazici University, 2011

Monday, March 3, 4:30-5:30 pm, Kansas Union, Kansas Room

 

The defense at Gallipoli (1915) has been of major significance in Turkish history. The event has been the subject of a large number of writings, from historical accounts to personal narratives. Literary works have also fed the public imagination. Since the actual battles, Gallipoli has been celebrated as a moment of pride. At times it has been viewed as a victory reminiscent of the past Ottoman glory. More important has been recognition that Gallipoli was a turning point that helped reinforce a burgeoning Turkish identity. The representation of Gallipoli in Turkish literature has been marked by varying intensity and emphases that reflect the phases undergone by the nationalist current.

The lecture is part of the University of Kansas centennial commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs at http://european.ku.edu/events-0 Sponsored by the European Studies Program, the Center for Global & International Studies, and the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies. Approved for GAP credit.


 


Lecture

Per Øhrgaard 

Distinguished Visiting Max Kade Foundation Professor
Faculty of Languages, Communication, and Culture, Copenhagen Business School
Board of Directors, Carlsberg Foundation

"The Elephant in the Room: The Story of the Carlsberg Foundation or Why Business Needs the Humanities"

Thursday, February 20, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Hall Center for the Humanities


Cancelled due to snow:


Professor Marille Hahne, Zurich University of the Arts, Switzerland
Film Screenings
Monday &Tuesday, November 18 & 19

Professor Hahne will present documentary & short fiction films made by students at the Zurich UniversIty of the Arts (ZHdK), including the Student-Oscar winning short Paraveh.  ZHdK is one of Europe’s largest universities of the arts with a total of over 2500 students.  The ZHdK offers Switzerland’s only professional education in cinema creation.  Student productions consistently win prestigious international film awards.  Professor Hahne will highlight a selection of outstanding films and discuss the ZHdK’s approaches to student filmmaking. Free admission and open to all. Co-sponsored by the School of The Arts, Film & Media Studies, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures and the European Studies Program.  Earn credit for GAP.

Monday, November 18, 6:30 - 10:00 pm
330 Strong Hall

MA NA SAPNA (A Mother’s Dream) a documentary film about surrogate mothers in India (73 min), + 1 short film TBA
Tuesday, November 19, 5:00-8:00 pm
Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union
Short documentary & fiction films concerning issues of migration

 


 

Coffee @ The Commons with Artist Joachim Schmid
Wednesday, September 25, 1:00 pm
Spooner Hall, The Commons

A conversation with Berlin-based artist Joachim Schmid about making artist's books in the age of the Internet, digital photography, online photo-sharing, and print-on-demand. Audience members are encouraged to familiarize themselves with Schmid's work ahead of time, as the dialogue between artist and audience will comprise the majority of the event. For more information about Schmid's artistic pursuits and examples of his work, see his website: http://schmid.wordpress.com/.

Sponsored by the Department of Design, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Department of Visual Art, the European Studies Program, the Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities, the Center for Global and International Studies, and The Commons. Approved for GAP and Arts Engagement Certificate credit.

 

 

 

 


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